✯✯✯ House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis

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House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis



The fortune is significant for the reader, however, because it confirms what we are already learning about Esperanza: she is too independent to be tied to any one place she lives. Alicia, House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis, is portrayed outside, talking to Esperanza, or on House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis train on her way House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis school — education is her ticket to freedom. Esperanza thinks they Explain What It Means To Be The Best Version Of Yourself Essay magical, and they do House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis to symbolize the Three House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis of mythology. Edna is non-committal, and House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis stands there hesitating until finally the people leave. She is now sick of imagining what might happen if she went out with a boy, dreaming about it, and simply wants it House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis happen. House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis meets Cathy, Athletes Are Not Overpaid Essay tells her her opinion about everyone in the neighborhood. Since she was so beautiful House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis was not allowed to show herself Berliozs Symphony Analysis the rest of the House On Mango Street Mamacita Character Analysis besides her husband. Discover Create Flashcards Mobile apps.

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros - Summary \u0026 Analysis

And what about the Vargas kids? Their games of chicken on Mr. Benny's roof indicate to us that they're reckless. But more significantly, a person's location in this book often indicates to the reader his or her place in society. This is particularly true for the female characters. Esperanza's Mama, for instance, occupies domestic spaces — she's portrayed either in the bedroom or the kitchen. For Esperanza, she's a comforting, homey presence, but she's also limited — "she doesn't know which subway train to take to get downtown" She encourages Esperanza to study so she doesn't wind up with the same kind of life.

Consider the number of women in the book who sit by the window of their homes — Great-Grandma Esperanza, Rafaela who drinks papaya juice, and Mamacita. All of these women feel trapped in their own homes, and their position by the window indicates to us their longing to be free. Marin, too, can't leave the house of her aunt and uncle, so she sits at the very limit of her prescribed area — the front yard — and watches the boys go by, maybe hoping that one of them will take her away from there. Some female characters do get to go outside. Little kids, for example, like Esperanza and Nenny, Lucy, and Rachel, can run around on the streets with impunity — they're not subject to the same sexist restrictions that make life so difficult for adult women on Mango Street.

But what happens when these little girls put on high heels and pretend to be adults for a day? The streets suddenly become sort of threatening — men and boys on bicycles start to circle like buzzards, and lecherous old men try to kiss them. A few women do manage to buck social expectations and remain free and independent, as evidenced by their occupation of spaces outside the home. Edna's daughter Ruthie, for example, displays a fear of confined spaces — she won't even go into Mr.

Benny's candy store — and would rather stay on Mango Street with her mom than go back to her husband's house in the suburbs. Alicia, too, is portrayed outside, talking to Esperanza, or on the train on her way to school — education is her ticket to freedom. Themes All Themes. Characters All Characters Sally Marin. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Everything you need for every book you read. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive.

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The House on Mango Street , which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Her husband worked hard to bring her and her baby to America. She is a huge woman, and when she emerges from the taxi for the first time she looks like an enormous flower. Once she arrives Mamacita never leaves the apartment, and she refuses to learn English. Some of the neighbors think she never leaves because she is too fat to get down the stairs, but Esperanza thinks it is because Mamacita is afraid of English. Mamacita is not trapped so much by her husband as by her own insecurities. Again, she is not mature enough to feel relaxed with boys, but she is clearly interested in, at least, the theoretical idea of spending time with them.

This aspect of Esperanza resurfaces in "Hips," where she, Rachel, Lucy and Nenny make up songs while jumping rope about what their womanly hips will be like when they get them. The songs are funny and exuberant "Some are skinny like chicken lips" and mostly speculative: the girls wonder what they will use their hips for. They are all somewhat nervous about growing up, but their games make them more comfortable--and, for Esperanza, so does making fun of Nenny for being younger. In fact, she draws a greater and greater distinction between herself and her younger sister as the book progresses, which further reveals her interest in appearing adult.

Esperanza is pulled back into immaturity, however, when she begins work at her first job, at a photo finishing store. She tries to appear confident, but she is clearly intimidated by all the older people on the job, until a seemingly nice older man comes in for the afternoon shift and befriends her. She is grateful, until he asks her for a birthday kiss. As she leans in to kiss his cheek, he grabs both sides of her face and kisses her on the mouth, not letting her go. Though the chapter ends there, the reader understands the consequence of this: just when she is beginning to feel safe in a frightening place, she is, in a sense, betrayed by someone she trusted.

One senses that, instead of feeling bold at her first job, she feels small and insignificant. Esperanza reveals her tender side when she comforts her father after he tells her his own father has died. Though she depends on her father, she does not seem dismayed by his breakdown into grief. She simply holds him as he cries, thinking of how much she values him. Esperanza, while still a child in many ways, is no longer able to childishly deny responsibility for her own actions.

Thus, she feels tremendously guilty about a childish game she played with Lucy and Rachel. Nevertheless, she was kind to Esperanza. She listened to her read books, and encouraged her to continue to write her own poems and stories. Unfortunately, Lupe dies the same die, and Esperanza must deal with her guilt. This is an important way for Esperanza to realize that what she liked about her aunt was her interest in her writing--and, by extension, Esperanza realizes how important her writing is to herself.

Esperanza visits "Elenita, witch woman," at her apartment. Elenita is a neighbor who has many boisterous children and lots of tacky furniture. She is a fortune teller, and Esperanza pays her five dollars to read Tarot cards for her. With cartoons playing on the TV in the background, Elenita tells Esperanza that she sees a "home in the heart. The fortune is significant for the reader, however, because it confirms what we are already learning about Esperanza: she is too independent to be tied to any one place she lives.

She herself does not realize this yet, and is still ashamed of living on Mango Street. One night at a dance, Marin meets a boy named Geraldo, who has recently emigrated from Mexico. After the dance, he gets hit by a car and killed. He has no identification, so Marin goes with him to the hospital. Esperanza relates the story, impersonating non-Hispanics who hear the story: "Just another wetback. You know the kind. The ones who always look ashamed. This is one of the few points in the book where she comments about a general experience shared by many people she knows; usually, the power of her stories comes from their intimate, specific nature.

Her husband brought her and their child from Mexico, and now she is miserable, always wanting to go back there, never leaving her apartment and refusing to speak English. She fights with her husband about leaving constantly, and when her son begins to sing a song he heard on TV, she begins to cry. Although Mamacita is somewhat ridiculous, with her enormous body and tiny pink shoes, she is also tragic. She symbolizes the difference between Mexico and Chicago, and the pain, alienation and loneliness that difference can cause. Ruthie plays with the kids and laughs all by herself, while walking her dog.

She says she is married and that her husband is coming to get her soon, but he never does. When some adults invite Ruthie to play bingo with them, she stands on the porch, calling to Edna, asking her if she should go. Edna is non-committal, and Ruthie stands there hesitating until finally the people leave. The kids let Ruthie deal the cards in their game that night. The difference between what Esperanza knows and what the reader can learn from her stories is evident. Clearly, there is something wrong with Ruthie, and while Esperanza may have some vague awareness of that, she does not entirely understand it. The reader, on the other hand, sees right away that a grown woman who depends greatly on her mother and spends much of her time playing with children is, in some way, maladjusted.

The same technique is used in the story of the Earl of Tennessee. He works nights and keeps to himself, so no one in the neighborhood really knows him. They are all interested in him, but somehow they disagree about what his wife looks like: some say she is blond, others think she is redheaded. Esperanza, who relates the story, does not know the truth, which is evident to the reader: Earl is bringing prostitutes to his home.

Esperanza casually gives us just enough information to figure this out, but does not know enough to realize for herself what the information means he brings the women to the house holding their arms tightly, and they never stay long, for example. This story has several functions: it offers another aspect of the character of the neighborhood through Earl, and also highlights the nosiness-- and innocence-- of the rest of the neighborhood.

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